Ed's Blog

"Some people know everything, but that's all they know."

FIFTY YEARS OF MIDDLE EAST POLICY ON VERGE OF COLLAPSE

Fifty years of U.S. Middle East policy is on the verge of collapse. On all sides countries inimical to its interests or hostile to its existence surround Israel. At the same time, the Islamist-fundamentalist movement is gaining influence and power while U.S. leverage in the region plummets. Iran is on the verge of building nuclear weapons as it supplies ever more deadly weapons to Hezbollah and Hamas. It’s not clear what will reverse these trends at this stage, but strong U.S. leadership and action is needed now more than ever.  (Read the full column at EWRoss.com)

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9 Responses

  1. Reposted from LinkedIn says:

    LinkedIn Group: Politics on the Rocks

    Discussion: FIFTY YEARS OF MIDDLE EAST POLICY ON VERGE OF COLLAPSE

    Hi Ed,

    What would you expect, when in the White House we have someone who fully supports Radical Moslems!

    Posted by William Lyrberg

  2. Reposted from LinkedIn says:

    LinkedIn Group: Wartime Professionals™

    Discussion: FIFTY YEARS OF MIDDLE EAST POLICY ON VERGE OF COLLAPSE

    Ed Ross … like the article it’s a clear synopsis what has me wondering though is this:

    the present climate of political/cultural opinion in both US and UK appears to be dominated by, for the want of a better phrase, the Global Europa cultural collectiveness.
    Which tends towards berating ourselves and our heritage and achievements as sovereign nations. Only ever seeing ‘the warts’ and *not* the ‘all’.

    If Mr President did take a more robust aggressive approach wouldn’t there be a ‘Pavlov-Dog’ leftwing response and outcry? As you note, ‘the partisan bickering’ as expressed pre-during-post elections would seem toindicate a President that robustly defends our cultural values and potential threats to our ‘way of life as we know it’. been pilloried?
    Making it near impossible to proceed effectively and quickly enough?

    Before shaping the Middle East and ‘taking the people with…’ don’t we in the West, have to address the cultural ‘default point’ of leftwing collectiveness in our own countries?

    Posted by Marina Knife

  3. Reposted from LinkedIn says:

    LinkedIn Group: The Intelligence Community

    Discussion: FIFTY YEARS OF MIDDLE EAST POLICY ON VERGE OF COLLAPSE

    Before 7 months in Group The Political Conservative Objective .
    In order to live in peace has to be promoted and change minds by professional marketers.
    Policy now needs a team of professional marketers with special talents. Find the best marketing methods for the implementation of political thought.

    Egypt elected, I think that Egypt must embrace all religions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam) this is Egypt throughout history. Must be a new thought building peace with Israel.
    19 hours ago

    Follow Spencer A.
    Spencer A. Lehmann, RHU • “May kill me because this is what I believe it.”

    Kamal, it takes courage to post such sentiments, given the current philosophical political agenda being expressed in Egypt today.

    That said, should an harm befall you or your family for your stating your “stand”, then Egypt is indeed in trouble. Voices are not silenced when they speak an obvious truth to a government willing to listen to more than one perspective.

    Mazel tov, my friend. 🙂
    Posted by M. Kamal

  4. Reposted from LinkedIn says:

    LinkedIn Group: Friends of the United States of America

    Discussion: FIFTY YEARS OF MIDDLE EAST POLICY ON VERGE OF COLLAPSE

    And the United States has also supported many brutal and corrupt dictators like the Shah of Iran and Saddam Hussein as long as they could be useful in some way. This has been American foreign policy throughout the world for over 100 years. “Play ball with us and we will turn a blind eye to your own domestic affairs.”

    Posted by Jeff Hill

  5. Reposted from LinkedIn says:

    LinkedIn Group: The Intelligence Community

    Discussion: FIFTY YEARS OF MIDDLE EAST POLICY ON VERGE OF COLLAPSE

    Now the larger questions: By sheer, mere accident (incompetence, misjudgment)? By design from the beginning (adherence to agenda through implementation of activation of policy and attainment of signposts)?

    Posted by Thomas P. (Tom) Logan

  6. Reposted from LinkedIn says:

    LinkedIn Group: Fox News Networking Group

    Discussion: FIFTY YEARS OF MIDDLE EAST POLICY ON VERGE OF COLLAPSE

    If the U.S. middle east policy is on the verge of collapse may be because it was simply tailored and implemented to serve the interests of one side at the expense of everything and anything else.

    Posted by Mounir Hamza

  7. Reposted from LinkedIn says:

    LinkedIn Group: POLITICAL WORLD

    Discussion: FIFTY YEARS OF MIDDLE EAST POLICY ON VERGE OF COLLAPSE

    ”President George W. Bush invaded Iraq, overthrew Saddam Hussein, and established a democratic Iraq.”??? Basic services for Iraqi people haven`t been provided,yet. Sectarian attacks are being performed on dayli bases. Regular Iraqi`s government doesn`t have control on its northern territories….

    Posted by stojan andonovski

  8. Reposted from LinkedIn says:

    LinkedIn Group: Naval Postgraduate School Alumni

    Discussion: FIFTY YEARS OF MIDDLE EAST POLICY ON VERGE OF COLLAPSE

    This is the one of the strangest articles I’ve read in recent times…sorry, the sky is not falling. The article is based on the assertion that U.S. leverage in the region is plummeting, while Islamist-fundamentalists are gaining traction, that Iran is on the verge of building nuclear weapons, and is supplying ever more deadly weapons to Hezbollah and Hamas. Based on recent events the opening assertion that our leverage in the region is plummeting is simply off the mark. Our diplomatic efforts in Saudi Arabia, UAE, Bahrain, Yemen, North Africa, Egypt, Lebanon, and Jordan while balancing the PLA and Hezbollah appear quite engaging and meaningful. I don’t see any more or less influence by Islamic-fundamentalists, that issue appears pretty much where it was a year ago when it comes to the general population across the Middle East, in fact they may be losing ground. Iran is a different context altogether. Iran is probably the most powerful broker in the region and has history and ties throughout the region acting in its favor. This requires a vastly more sophisticated approach than simply a “red line don’t cross or else approach.” While it can be seen that U.S. leadership and action are needed, exactly what that means is not clear given the sea change of governmental and populist actions over the past year. While the actions of prior presidents and their achievements were necessary to keep the lid on the Middle East during the Cold War and Post Cold War eras one thing to consider is that we still have Israel isolated amongst the Arab surroundings, and not until the Arab spring was there any hope of altering the stalemate that the region has been living under for the past 60 plus years. Israel is more obviously at odds with the movements of the region and there is a dire need for Israel to alter its approach to the new realities. While I agree with the notion that Israel has the right to defend itself, the stale tactics of accepting acts of violence up to a point, and then accosting the adversary obviously is an outmoded approach moving forward to secure Israel’s security and peace in the region. There is no evidence that what occurred during the Arab Spring is yielding any more or less toward ultimate take over by all the “bad” factions. Everything is still very much in a state of flux and there is no amount of overt, strong-arm influence as applied in the past that the U.S. can use with any democratic credibility to push the region. On the other hand there is clear evidence that all responsible parties involved are conscious of the fact that things will not get better without positive affirmation from the U.S. What has begun will continue with our influence, not our DNA all over the product. There is the rest of the world that must engage, we can lead, but our leadership must be measured, consistent and even handed. Just as the great presidents mentioned in the article provided leadership of the time, this administration and future administrations must be prepared to do the same in the new and evolving environment. One last thought the article talks about the fears of the Middle East “experts”. I’m sorry, based upon the questionable performance of the Middle East “experts” over the past 20 or so years, the phrase “Middle East expert” certainly must be relegated to an oxymoron. Perhaps it is time to revisit our fifty year old Middle East Policy and abandon that which is isolated to the old world order and recast and reinvent a new set of policies.

    Posted by Tony Kopacz

  9. Reposted from LinkedIn says:

    LinkedIn Group: POLITICAL WORLD

    Discussion: FIFTY YEARS OF MIDDLE EAST POLICY ON VERGE OF COLLAPSE

    The “Arab Spring” was started by a frustrated young man in Tunis, Tunisia by setting himself on fire because of the way he was being treated by an employer. Word spread and the nation went on a peaceful revolt just and the thing took off and went over the whole Middle East except Zionist Israel because of the iron fisted way of the military there.

    By the way, Kent, the Arabs have cell phones, blackberrys, and even computers all over the countries there. As a matter of fact the very first computer was invented by an Egyptian Arab over 2000 years ago. Look it up.

    Posted by Jim Hyder

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